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Fire & Rescue Department

2009 News Releases

 

LINCOLN FIRE AND RESCUE
1801 “Q” Street, Lincoln, NE 68508, 441-8350, fax 441-7098

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: October 8, 2009
FOR MORE INFORMATION: Jeanne Pashalek, Deputy Fire Chief, 441-8370 or Jeff Hatcher, Fire Captain, 441-8381

FIRE OFFICIALS SAY “STAY FIRE SMART! DON’T GET BURNED.”

Lincoln Fire and Rescue is asking all families to practice their home fire escape plans at 6 p.m. Thursday, October 8 as part of National Fire Prevention Week. All fire vehicles will sound their air horns at that time as a reminder. Fire officials recommend that families practice their fire escape plans at least once a year and use these tips:

  • Practice finding your way out of the house with your eyes closed, crawling or saying low and feeling your way out of the house.
  • Never open doors that are hot to the touch.
  • Teach your family to stop, drop and roll if their clothes catch fire.
  • Designate a meeting place outside and take attendance. Get out and stay out.
  • Remember to escape first, then notify the fire department.
  • Make sure everyone in your family knows at least two ways to escape from each room in the house.
  • Install a smoke alarm on every level of the house and test the batteries every month..

Fire departments across the nation are joining with the National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) is focusing on burn prevention during National Fire Prevention Week through October 10. The 2009 slogan is “Stay Fire Smart! Don’t Get Burned,” and the campaign focuses on ways to keep homes fire safe and prevent painful burns.

“We all know that if a child touches a hot stove, he or she learns a lesson and stays away from a stove in the future,” said Fire Chief Niles Ford. “But this cliché does not take into account the pain and suffering. Burns should not be part of the learning process, and injuries are entirely preventable.”

Each year in the U.S., about 4,000 people die as a result of home fires and burns, and more than 200,000 people are treated in emergency rooms for burn injuries. DO WE HAVE LOCAL STATS - ARE WE DOING BETTER OR WORSE THAN THE NATIONAL AVERAGE? Ford says the most common types of burn injuries result from fire or flame burns, scalds and contact burns.

Lincoln Fire and Rescue offers the follow tips to “Stay Fire Smart! Don’t Get Burned:”

  • Keep hot foods and liquids away from the edges of tables and counters so they cannot be pulled or knocked over.
  • Maintain a three-foot “kid-free” zone around the stove.
  • Never hold a child in your arms while preparing hot food or drinking a hot beverage.
  • Be careful when using curling irons, oven, irons, lamps and heaters.
  • Install tamper-resistant electrical outlets to prevent children from sticking objects into them.
  • Never leave a child alone in a room with a lit candle, portable heater, lit fireplace or stove or hot appliance.
  • Wear short or close-fitting sleeves when cooking.
  • Set your hot water temperature no higher than 120 degrees.
  • Install anti-scald valves on shower heads and faucets.
Fire departments have observed Fire Prevention Week for 85 years, making it the longest running public health and safety observance on record. For more information, visit The National Fire Protection Association.

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