Single-lane Roundabouts

Single Lane Roundabout

The most common type of roundabout in Lincoln is a single-lane roundabout. As you approach a roundabout there will be a YIELD sign and there may be a dashed yield line. Slow down, watch for pedestrians and bicyclists, and be prepared to stop if necessary. If another car is waiting ahead of you, do not stop in the crosswalk. When you enter, yield to circulating traffic on the left, but do not stop if it is clear.

A conventional roundabout will have ONE-WAY signs or directional arrows mounted in the center island. They help guide traffic and indicate that you must drive to the right of the center island. Upon passing the street prior to your exit, turn on your right turn signal and watch for pedestrians and bicyclists as you exit. Left turns and U-turns are completed by traveling around the center island.

Single Lane Roundabout


Multi-lane Roundabouts

Multi-lane Roundabout

You choose your lane in a multi-lane roundabout the same way you would in a traditional multi-lane intersection. Lane directions will be indicated on a sign approaching the intersection and also painted on the road. Drivers can make U-turns by selecting the left lane and driving around the circle.

Similar to a single-lane roundabout, as you approach a multi-lane roundabout there will be a YIELD sign and a dashed yield line. Before entering the roundabout, choose your lane, slow down, watch for pedestrians and bicyclists, and be prepared to stop if necessary. If another car is waiting ahead of you, do not stop in the crosswalk.

While in the roundabout, stay in your lane; do not stop or pass in the roundabout. Do not drive next to a large truck using the roundabout, as they might need to take up multiple lanes. When exiting the roundabout, turn on your right turn signal and watch for pedestrians and bicyclists.

Multi-lane Roundabout


Large Vehicles

Truck apron The "truck apron" allows extra room for large trucks or trailers.

Roundabouts are designed to accommodate large vehicles, however large trucks do need more space when driving in a roundabout. A "truck apron" on the edge of the center island in a roundabout, usually defined by colored concrete, allows large trucks and trucks with trailers to maneuver through a roundabout by allowing the wheels of the truck or trailer to roll onto the truck apron. All drivers should avoid driving next to or passing large trucks when maneuvering through a roundabout so the truck can safely make it through the intersection.


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